The following links are to  Websites and Articles that we have found interesting, on the subjects of wrongful convictions, ritual sex abuse scandals, false memories, sex offenders, and more.
Websites:
Articles:
CSOM: Center for Sex Offender Management
Understanding Sex Offenders: An Introductory Curriculum
Websites & Articles
Proceed with Care When Covering Sex "Scandals." by Edward Wasserman, Miami Herald. Dec. 18, 2011.
Court Case Asks if "Big Brother" is Spelled GPS. New York Times. Sept. 10, 2011.
Man Challenges Requirement to Register As a Sex Offender. Congress, Courts and Decisions Blog. Sept. 3, 2011.
Sex Panic and the Punitive State
by Roger N. Lancaster, Professor of Anthropology, George Mason University.
Sex Offenders: The Last Pariahs. by Roger Lancaster, New York Times Opinion Page. Aug. 20, 2011.
Criminally Innocent: How Can You Be Exonerated Of A Crime That Never Happened by Jordan Smith, The Austin Chronicle. Nov. 5, 2010.
Jurors Question Deputies Testimony. Panelists' concerns over what they see as 'fabrications' spur an internal affairs investigation into law enforcement actions and testimony in a Compton weapons case.
by Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times. Sept. 19, 2011.
Social Pressure and False Memory. New Research at the Israeli Weizmann Institute.
State Fails Wrongly Convicted Prisoners. By Henry Weinstein, Los Angeles Times. Feb. 23, 2008.
Books:
Surviving Justice: America's Wronfully Convicted and Exonerated
Compiled and edited by Lola Vollen & Dave Eggers
Recidivism Among Sex
Offenders in Connecticut

State of Connecticut
Office of Policy and Management
Criminal Justice Policy & Planning Division February 15, 2012
Blogs
The Caging of America: Why Do We Lock Up So Many People?
by Adam Gopnick, The New Yorker, January 30, 2012.
Beyond DNA: Difficult Tests for the Justice System
Freeing the wrongfully convicted through science was the easy part. Now what?
by Leslie Minora, Dallas Observer News, December 29, 2011.
Maybe there is hope for those who don't have DNA to exonerate them?
In Doubt: The Psychology of the Criminal Justice System
by Dan Simon, Professor of Law and Psychology at University of Southern California (USC).